Author: Collin Prowler

What Type of Life Insurance Should You Buy?

Many people buy life insurance to provide a financial cushion for their loved ones after they die. However, several factors can influence how much you need and which type of policy is right for you.

Your health, family medical history, dangerous occupations, and hobbies affect your life insurance rates. It’s important to reevaluate your needs periodically. For more information, click the Life Insurance Upstate to proceed.

There are many different types of life insurance policies. The type you choose depends on your needs and goals. For example, some people may need a term policy to cover debts or mortgages, while others may want a permanent policy to provide income in the event of their death. You should consider all the options carefully before making a decision. You should also consult with a financial professional to get expert advice.

The insurer: Only certain companies can provide life insurance, and state insurance departments regulate them. The owner of a life insurance policy is known as the policyholder, and the person insured is called the beneficiary. The owner and the insured may be the same person, but they can also be separate individuals or entities. A life insurance policy can include riders, which are additions to the basic policy that change some of its features. For example, you can add accidental death coverage or a premium waiver rider. You can also purchase a joint life insurance policy, which insures two people with proceeds payable on the death of either one.

You can buy life insurance through an agent, a broker, or directly from the company. Insurance companies use a process called underwriting to decide whether to sell you a policy and, if so, how much it will cost. You must take a medical exam, and the insurance company will ask you questions about your health, job, and lifestyle. The company may decline to sell you a policy or increase the premium if it believes you are at a high risk of dying.

The actuary is the mathematical specialist who uses tables and formulas to estimate the chances of an individual’s death over a given period. This information is used to determine the amount of the death benefit and the amount of the premium. The actuary is also responsible for adjusting the premium to account for changes in mortality rates.

The term of a life insurance policy is usually limited to the insured’s lifetime, but some types of policies have other terms. For example, credit life insurance pays off the balance of a loan if the borrower dies before the loan is paid off. This type of insurance is typically sold to lenders to reduce their risk.

When a life insurance policyholder dies, the beneficiaries (or survivors) receive a lump sum of money known as the death benefit. The death benefit is typically used to pay for expenses like funeral costs, debts, and other final expenses. It can also be utilized to create an emergency fund or to settle for a child’s education. There are two main types of life insurance: whole life and term life. Each has its benefits and uses but shares the same basic structure.

Beneficiaries must submit proof of identity and a copy of the death certificate to claim the death benefit. They will also need to complete a life insurance claim form, asking for information about the policyholder and their relationship with them. They will also be invited to choose how they would like to receive the money once the life insurance company has processed it.

Life insurance companies must review the death benefits within 30 days of receiving the necessary documents. They will then notify the beneficiary of their decision, which may be to pay the death benefit, ask for additional information, or deny it. If the life insurance company denies a death benefit, they will provide a reason. The life insurance company will only deny a death benefit if they suspect fraud or misrepresentation on the application. This is especially true if the death occurred within the first few years of owning the policy.

If beneficiaries need help finding the policy documents in their home or digital records, they can check with the life insurance company or the National Association of Unclaimed Property. They can also check the Social Security Administration’s Death Master File, which contains names of people who have died and are reported to the Social Security Administration.

Life insurance policies can be paid out in a lump sum or installments. Lump sum payments are generally easier and faster for the life insurance company to process. They usually send the beneficiary a check or wire the money into their bank account electronically. Some life insurance policies can also be converted into an annuity, in which case the death benefits will be invested and paid back to the beneficiary in a series of payments over time.

There are a variety of life insurance policies available. Your policy type should be based on your overall financial plan. Factors to consider include the number of dependents and their cost, future education needs, current assets, debt, and income. A good life insurance policy should provide sufficient coverage to meet these needs without putting too much strain on your family’s finances.

Typically, the life insurance policy will provide a death benefit to the beneficiaries upon the insured’s death. In some cases, life insurance policies can also offer living benefits. These benefits are paid to the policyholder while they are still alive and can be used for things like paying for medical care or supplemental income.

The cost of a life insurance policy depends on several factors, including the amount of coverage and the length of the term. Most life insurance policies require a medical exam to determine the level of risk. The exam can be done at home, work, or doctor’s office. No-exam life insurance policies are also available for people with certain health issues.

In general, the premiums of a life insurance policy are paid regularly and accumulate over time. These premiums are often subsidized by the life insurance company, which allows them to build up cash value in the policy. The cash value built up in a life insurance policy can vary from one company to the next. Some policies may allow the policyholder to withdraw or borrow against the cash value, while others will only let the policyholder use the money for funeral expenses.

A key component of a life insurance policy is the non-forfeiture provisions, which set minimum amounts that must be in place to keep the policy active. Life insurance companies also use a standard mortality table to help them calculate the minimum required non-forfeiture values for each policy. In addition, a life insurance policy may have a free-look period that allows the policyholder to examine the policy for up to 30 days and, if they are not satisfied, return it for a refund of all premiums paid.

Life insurance provides a safety net for your loved ones during your death. It can pay off outstanding debts like credit card balances, car loans, or mortgages, provide money for funerals and other final expenses, or help fund children’s college tuition. It can also supplement retirement savings. The type of policy you choose depends on your family’s needs, financial situation, and your goals for the future. You should review your life insurance coverage regularly to ensure it aligns with your changing needs and responsibilities.

The types of policies available vary widely, from simple term insurance to permanent policies that may offer cash value in addition to death benefits. Term life insurance is the most popular, providing the most coverage for a specific period. It is usually cheaper than other types of life insurance, and it can be renewable. On the other hand, permanent policies can be guaranteed to last for the rest of your life, provided that you pay the premiums.

Many permanent life insurance policies, such as whole and universal, have a cash value component. These policies accumulate interest regularly, and the amount of the cash value increases as the policy ages. The value can be used to reduce your premium or purchase paid-up additional insurance; the accumulated interest is tax-deferred. Some policies also offer the option to invest the cash value in various pools, such as stocks and bonds, to achieve higher rates of return.

Almost everyone can qualify for life insurance, though the cost or premium level may differ based on age, health, and lifestyle. Some types of life insurance require medical information and an initial waiting period, while others do not. Some insurers offer specialized policies for people with pre-existing conditions or smokers, and some companies specialize in meeting the unique needs of families with special circumstances. Some brokers can help you find the right policy for your needs. Some brokers are independent, while others work with a particular company.

What is Keyword Research, and Why is it Necessary?

If you’re looking to drive organic traffic and improve your website’s ranking, keyword research is a necessary tool.

Rank Boss combines an understanding of search intent, traffic potential, difficulty, and business potential. For example, a list of keywords relevant to your brand.

seo

You can do this using a free tool or a premium paid one like Moz’s Keyword Explorer.

Keyword research is developing an extensive list of keywords for which a website owner wishes to rank in search engine results pages (SERPs). That involves digging deep into what people type into Google when searching for a certain product, service, business, or type of content. The goal is to find keywords relevant to the company and highly searched so that when someone clicks on one of the resulting SERPs, it takes them to high-quality website content that meets their needs.

The types of keywords marketers identify vary depending on their goals and the needs of their audience. For example, broad keywords associated with an industry, such as “making money,” have many searches but are highly competitive because many websites want to rank for those words. Luckily, with the help of a few free tools, it’s possible to find variations on a core keyword that have a smaller volume but are less competitive and can still drive traffic.

Once a business has identified the right keywords, it must create a content strategy focusing on them. That means creating posts, articles, and other content addressing those keywords. Search engines reward sites that are authoritative and useful, so making sure your content is genuinely helpful to your audience will go a long way toward helping you rank for your chosen keywords.

Another aspect of keyword research that’s becoming increasingly important is understanding how intent impacts SEO. Because a consumer’s search is more about the outcome they wish to achieve than just the information that carries that keyword, marketers must ensure their content matches that intent.

It’s often useful to conduct keyword research at the start of the content creation process or even before that to scope out trends and blind spots that competitors may have missed. It’s also wise to re-evaluate keyword research regularly to keep up with search engine algorithm changes and uncover new opportunities for ranking well.

Keyword research is discovering what search terms your audience uses to find products, services, and businesses like yours. You then use these keywords in your content to make it more likely that those searchers will see your content among the results of their queries.

It’s important to remember that keyword research is not just about the words you use but about understanding your target audience and their intent. Knowing why they’re searching for something can help you create content that addresses their needs, wants, and expectations.

There are several tools you can use for keyword research. Some are free, like Google Keyword Planner, while others require a subscription. A few of the most popular are Moz, Semrush, and Answer The Public. These paid tools offer more in-depth information on search volume, search difficulty, and other data that can be helpful when creating an SEO strategy.

The first step of the process is to develop a seed keyword. That is any keyword or phrase that defines your niche and helps you narrow down the search results. Then, you can enter the seed into a tool like Semrush to generate a list of keyword ideas for you to choose from.

Once you have a list of potential keywords, take some time to consider each one. The monthly search volume (MSV) and the competition level can be examined. The higher the MSV, the more competition there is for that keyword, so it may be harder to rank highly.

Similarly, the lower the MSV, the less competition there is for that keyword. It’s also important to consider what kind of content you will create for each keyword, whether a blog post or an e-commerce product page. You need to ensure that your content meets the searcher’s intent – if you try to sell something to a consumer looking for information, they will quickly leave your website.

Once you’ve settled on keywords, you can start creating your content. It’s a good idea to have an SEO checklist to help you keep track of your work and ensure that each piece of content you produce meets your goals.

Keyword research is developing a list of keywords that search engines estimate are likely to bring in traffic. For example, if you sell a product that helps people with back pain, you might want to target “back pain relief.” Then, you can create content around those keywords that align with your audience’s intent. With a good set of keywords, ranking well in search engine results pages (SERPs) is easier.

People type keywords into search engines when looking for information or products. But finding keywords can be challenging, even with the right tools.

Several keyword research tools are out there, all of which work roughly the same: you plug in one seed keyword, and the device pulls out suggestions for related keywords. The most popular and well-known is Google Keyword Planner, which is made for advertisers who want to display paid search ads on Google, but it’s a useful tool for SEOs, too.

If you’re on a budget or prefer a simpler interface, there are free keyword research tools that can help you find keywords. These tools usually only have a limited number of keyword suggestions and may not provide the most accurate results, but they can be helpful for beginners.

For more advanced users, there are tools like Answer the Public, which my agency uses at NP Digital, and Ahrefs’ Site Explorer, which is available for Pro members (though that membership also includes competitor analysis and other features not related to keyword research). These tools provide a more comprehensive data set but are often more complicated than Google Keyword Planner.

Once you have a list of keywords, it’s important to prioritize them and determine the effort required to rank for each. For example, if you’re writing an article about “back pain relief,” it will probably take much more time and resources to rank for that keyword than for “back injury recovery.”

Checking your competitors’ ranking for each targeted keyword is also good. That can help you identify gaps in your content and ideas for new pieces. It can also help you avoid keyword cannibalization when multiple articles or blogs target the same keywords.

Keyword research aims to help people find your business, whether you have a blog or an e-commerce website or offer local services such as lawn care. To do this, you need to develop a list of keywords describing your potential customers’ search terms when looking for your offer. Then, it would help if you prioritized those keywords based on traffic potential, ranking difficulty, and competition.

Many online marketing experts suggest focusing on keywords with low competitiveness and high traffic potential. Still, consider the search intent behind each keyword to ensure it’s relevant to your business. You’ll also think about how difficult it would be for your business to rank for each keyword and whether you have the resources and expertise to compete with larger companies that can invest heavily in SEO.

Choosing seed keywords is the first step in keyword research. These words describe your product or service and that you can plug into a tool such as Google’s Keyword Planner or a paid tool such as Ahrefs, Semrush, Wordtracker, or Ubersuggest. These tools will then generate a list of related keywords and phrases that you can use to refine your seed keyword.

While the criteria for identifying keywords can be debated, most researchers agree that keywords are the central building blocks of any cultural discourse. They are inescapable, and the choice of a keyword may reflect social interests as much as linguistic characteristics.

You Sell Widgets, You Rank for Widgets, But You Also Want to Rank for Gizmos. Should Gizmos Get a Separate Site?

“Does Google expect my site to focus on just one thing?” is a common concern people have about their SEO campaigns, both local and non-local.  You might also have that concern if you’re thinking about wheeling out a service or product on your site that’s very different from your other services or products.

The one offering seems at least a little out-of-place with the other offerings on your site.  You wonder whether by adding it to your site you’ll mess up any existing rankings.  Maybe you also wonder whether the different/unusual service or product even can pull in some rankings on the main site, or if it needs to live on a separate site.

In considering an additional site, you’re not looking for extra work, but rather just don’t want to mess up a good thing or go on a fool’s errand.   Of course, there may also be a “branding” concern, but I’ll set that aside because it may not be an issue for you, or maybe you’ve already figured it out.  So I’ll assume your main worry is purely an SEO one – about whether you’ll water down your site and end up not ranking for much at all.

I’ll give you my short answer now, and fill in some gaps in a minute: you CAN successfully branch out on your site and rank for a service/product that’s different from the others, if you play your cards right that will not mess up your rankings for the other offerings, and unless branding is a big concern you do not need a separate site.

As usual, what I say is based on what I’ve seen for clients and observed in the wild.  In keeping with that, here are a few real-life examples I’ve been involved in, which may sound like the situation you’re in:

Example situation #1: A roofing company tries to rank also for siding terms and gutter terms, and succeeds.

Example situation #2: A divorce attorney tries to rank also for bankruptcy and personal-injury terms, and succeeds.

Example situation #3: A couples counselor tries to rank also for individual-therapy terms, and succeeds.

Example situation #4: A dentist who focuses mostly on cosmetic procedures tries to rank also for implant-dentistry terms, and succeeds.

Example situation #5: A battery shop tries to rank also for phone-repair terms, and succeeds.

I have more examples, but you get the idea.  In those cases and in many others I’ve seen, the branching-out didn’t involve whipping up a separate site for the different service.  You’ve probably also seen exactly what I’m talking about: No doubt you have seen some local businesses outrank you for terms that are dead-on relevant to your business and not very relevant to theirs, and thought “Why are they outranking me for that term – WTF?”

The kicker is that if those competitors went the route you’ve considered – if they had created separate sites for the relative oddball services or products – there’s a good chance they wouldn’t have outranked you.  Instead they chose to kept everything together, and it seems to have worked out perfectly.

 

But wait a minute.  Doesn’t Google care about the theme of your whole site?  Don’t you get some advantage from focusing on a niche?  Doesn’t Google favor specialists over generalists (especially in the Google Maps results)?

Yes, to some extent.  Where all else is equal, the specialized site has an advantage over the plump site, probably because generally more of the pages are relevant to the niche and viable to rank, because the domain name is probably dead-on relevant, because probably a greater percentage of the links are from sites relevant to the niche, and for about half a dozen other reasons I can think of (speculate on).  That’s why you can create a separate site, and why (with some work) it can be extremely effective.

But the older site and the newer site are not equal.  Probably the most important difference is the old site typically has more links from relevant sites than the new site will for a while.  Google knows more about the older site in general, and sees more signs of life, including whether you whip up a page for the new service and existing visitors go to it right away (even before it ranks for anything).  Your site may already have a smattering of rankings for terms related to the unusual service or product, even though you don’t have any pages for it yet.  The difference is that in one case you’re raising a kid for 5-6 years and then teaching him or her to ride a bike, and in the other case you’re only teaching a kid to ride a bike.  One of those processes is much quicker.

You have options.  You can whip up a new site to target the different or unrelated service, but it will take longer.  In my experience it’s easier to expand the range of terms the existing site ranks for.

How do you go about that?  By doing the basic steps I talk about all the time, most importantly:

On your longtime site that’s all about widgets, make a detailed page on the gizmo you offer.Go heavy on the internal links to the page about the gizmo, including on the homepage, main navigation, footer, and on a couple of other other products/services pages.Add to your homepage a section all about the gizmo(s). Keep all the existing content about the widgets you’re so renowned for.Get links from a couple of sites that are more relevant to gizmos than to widgets, to complement the links you’ve already got from widget-related sites.Get Google Maps reviews and other reviews from customers who bought the gizmo and who go into a little detail in their reviews.If possible, specify a “Gizmo Maker” or “Gizmo Seller” category on your Google Business Profile (Google My Business) page.Study the “performance” tab in Google Search Console and see if you’re getting any impressions for gizmo terms.On an ongoing basis add detail, internal links, FAQs, reviews, photos, videos, or other content to your “gizmo” page.In the later stage of that process revisit the idea of the separate site for gizmos. Yes, the one I said you should skip in favor of working on the existing site. If it ranks well, great.  It may.  Or if it doesn’t rank, you can always redirect or axe it.  It probably won’t do as well as the page (or pages) on the older site, or it will take more work than you’re willing to put in, but that’s what you’re here to find out.  Once you’ve avoided a situation where a dime is holding up a dollar, experiment away.

 

You can also visit our other websites and post your article.

BBD Financial, Karltwiford, Plano Painting Service, Web Security Athletes, Italian EditorsDigital Learning Room,  Branson Homes Showcase, Clear High Speed Internet , Digital Native AUS, Happy Maker NowOptimology, Find Small Business Software, Ukon Line For Business Scotland, Computer ManiaAmbience AirconSitamohtCumming Fence Installation, UNH Express , Fence Contractors SacramentoMissouri Bits, Internet Gossip,  Packed In ItSwiss Line Trading, Alfa Auto Group, Katherine Lynch, San Mateo Web Design, Home Refit, My Business Resource, CMSDNN Module, The Sides Project, Drupalcamppa, Forehead Thermometers, Online Net BusinessM3 ConfPatrick HermanseoPeter Anania, Tree Bind, Internet Privacy Systems, Dentist 719Eonid

Types of Refinance Loans

refinance loans

When you refinance your home, you can take advantage of various benefits. One of these benefits is the opportunity to cash out some of the equity you already have in your home. If you need more money, Click Here to use a refinance loan to meet your needs. There are several types of refinance loans available.refinance loans

Cash-out refinances can be advantageous for many reasons. For starters, they can help you lower your monthly payments by taking advantage of lower interest rates. In addition, the extra cash you receive can be used for personal needs, such as home renovations or big-ticket items. However, be sure to use the cash wisely – you don’t want to end up with too much debt or risk losing your home.

Unlike a conventional refinance, a cash-out refinance allows you to access the equity in your home without extending your existing mortgage. This type of refinance requires that you have 10% to 20% of your equity left after the refinance. The exact percentage will depend on your lender and how much equity you want to access.

While there are many lenders who offer cash-out refinances, there are several things you should know before applying. The first thing to do is determine how much you can borrow. Different lenders offer different amounts and fees. Make sure that you find one that suits your needs and avoid any misleading offers. You should also request a Certificate of Eligibility to verify that you’re eligible for a cash-out to refinance. You should also get an appraisal on your home.

You should also understand that cash-out refinances require you to have a minimum credit score. This varies by lender, but generally speaking, you need to have a minimum credit score of at least 580 to qualify. You should also make sure that your debt-to-income ratio is less than 36%. Moreover, you should have a minimum of 20% equity in your home.

Cash-out refinances offer a unique opportunity for homeowners to access the equity they have built up in their homes. It is a smart way to obtain additional funds, but it’s important to know exactly what you’ll be using the money for before requesting a cash-out refinance.

Another way to tap home equity is to apply for a HELOC or home equity loan. These are both similar to cash-out refinances, but the main difference is that HELOCs don’t touch the primary mortgage. A HELOC can offer you a line of credit, which you can use for various things. However, the interest rates are higher than cash-out refinances.

Debt consolidation refinance is one way to get a lower interest rate on your loan. Typically, your credit score is the determining factor in whether you will qualify for a lower interest rate on your loan. However, it’s not always the case. A lower interest rate may mean that you will pay more in fees and interest, so make sure to consider your overall financial situation when choosing a debt consolidation refinance loan.

The interest rate on debt consolidation refinance is significantly lower than the interest rate on credit cards. Nevertheless, you should be very careful not to replace short-term debt with the long-term one. This could make it much more difficult to pay off your debt, and could even result in foreclosure.

Another thing to consider before getting a debt consolidation to refinance a loan is whether you have enough equity in your home. This means that the value of your home needs to be higher than the amount of your current debt. This is important because most lenders only allow a maximum loan-to-value ratio (LTV) of 80%. Therefore, you must have at least 10% equity in your home to qualify for a debt consolidation refinance loan.

Before you apply for a debt consolidation loan, you should collect all the necessary documentation, including your pay stubs, bank statements, tax returns for self-employed individuals, and more. The lender will then either send the loan proceeds to your creditors or send them directly to you. If you already have some credit card debt, be sure to pay it off first before applying for a debt consolidation loan. You should also set up automatic payments or use reminders to make your payments on time.

Getting a debt consolidation to refinance a mortgage is possible for borrowers with significant debt. This type of loan allows borrowers to lower their monthly expenses and improve their debt-to-income ratio. To find the right debt consolidation refinance loan for you, contact several lenders and explore different loan programs.

Wrapping up 2021 with our top 10!


30-second summary:

12 months, several curveballs, and some masterstrokesIf you missed out, today is a great day to look through the Search Engine Watch lens for the year gone byKey themes that were front of mind in 2021 – Google’s updates, cookie death counter-strategies, mastering customer experience elements, trust-building, and alternatives for search marketing and ranking

As the world, people, and of course businesses motored through a year of uncertainties – these crackers of articles gave your strategies an unfair advantage.

#1 – Google Page Experience update is all set to launch in May 2021 – Webmasters, hang in there!

You asked, “What is Page Experience, anyway? Do we really need to have an overflowing to-do list?” – and we answered everything around this enigma. This piece touched upon every aspect, angle, and action point that SEOs needed to know.

#2 – The search dilemma: looking beyond Google’s third-party cookie death

The ad tech and search industry continued to remain precarious that Google will use the cookie deprecation as a new way to establish market dominance to feed its own interests. Google expert, Susan Dolan drew from her rich experience and detailed realities of the search scape. She also shared insights and predicted future key themes that rose out of the 3p cookie death.

#3 – Everything you need to know about the Google MUM update

As the industry bid farewell to BERT, Google’s Multitask Unified Model (MUM) update in June 2021 opened new search experience dimensions. The cranked-up competition for search visibility between businesses and advertisers – left SEO practitioners and agencies with yet another burning question, “How will we win MUM’s good graces?” Joe Dawson’s comprehensive guide left no stone unturned.

#4 – Why killing your content marketing makes the most sense

“Kill your darlings”, yes, we said it! Though it sounded outlandish, this piece held wise and valuable advice from best-selling author Joe Pulizzi on why this could be one of the best business decisions you could’ve made in 2021.

#5 – Quora and Reddit: Powerhouses for SEO and marketing in 2021

Everyone is obsessed with Google, but did you know Reddit is the seventh most popular website in the US while Quora has a DR of 91? This guide shone a light on how your search strategy could take advantage of these platforms with diversification, tap into great brand-building opportunities, and enhance your E-A-T standing.

#6 – Now is the best time to stitch your search marketing loopholes before 2022

The third-party cookie still stands at a crucial intersection between digital marketing, SEO, paid media, web design, and several business tangents. The industry needed to think hard and think differently for a contingency plan. SEO pioneer, serial entrepreneur, and best-selling author, Kris Jones helped weave a tight SEO and search marketing strategy way ahead of 2022. Why? Because a stitch in time saves nine.

#7 – Seven first-party data capturing opportunities your business is missing out on

The internet continued zigging in a privacy-focused direction as a response to consumers’ increasing demand for a transparent, responsible, and ethical outlook towards their data. First-party data became indispensable and consumer trust, invaluable. While the playing field inched closer to the great reset, we revealed some hidden first-party gems every business could use to redesign their search marketing strategies.

#8 – UX: an important SEO ranking factor

The story of SEO and UX began almost 20 years ago with both making a foray into the market in the 1990s. Since then, SEO practitioners saw seasons change and the Page Experience, paired with data analysis finally etched UX as a key ranking factor. Atul Jindal condensed years of his experience working with fortune 50 companies into this SEO guide to help you win at SEO and search experience.

#9 – Cross-channel marketing: why you shouldn’t put all your eggs in the Google basket

The pandemic didn’t let us forget that while every business is unique, budgets too took a hit, making allocation stringent. But why did so many businesses still stick to the “big guns” when allocating spending? Adzooma CEO Rob Wass and Cambridge University’s Akanshaa Khare joined forces to challenge this notion. They produced some truly unique insights that would make stakeholders rethink their media spending habits.

#10 – Core Web Vitals report: 28 Ways to supercharge your site

Everyone remembers the chaos surrounding the Core Web Vitals in early 2021. SEO folks were keen to get ahead on optimizing their site and Twitter threads were full of speculation. Armed with information, we shared a 28-point checklist on action items to spot, optimize, and embrace the inevitable rollout of these new ranking factors.

Thank you for being valuable supporters throughout our journey. Team Search Engine Watch wishes everyone a happy year-end and an adventurous 2022!

*Ranked on page views, time on page, and bounce rate.

Subscribe to the Search Engine Watch newsletter for insights on SEO, the search landscape, search marketing, digital marketing, leadership, podcasts, and more.

Join the conversation with us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

The post Wrapping up 2021 with our top 10! appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

How to optimize keywords and SEO titles with popular keywords

30-second summary:

Title optimization of articles, blogs, or webpages is critical to get traffic and earn money from Adsense and affiliatesThe standard advice is to stick to one keyword phrase per page to maintain strict relevance and avoid getting penalized for keyword stuffingAdding extra related keywords, however, apart from the modifiers and words to create a sensible title has the potential to get more traffic to websitesHere are some good insights and tips on how you can optimize your keywords titles

Optimizing titles of articles, blogs or webpages is critical for getting traffic and earning money from Adsense and affiliates. The standard advice is to stick to one keyword phrase per page to maintain strict relevance and avoid getting penalized for keyword stuffing. But adding extra, related keywords, apart from the modifiers and words to create a sensible title, has the potential to get more traffic to your site.

In this article, I’ll review, my own experience in crafting carefully multiple keyword titles.

Keep the title short – one keyword phrase to a page

As a golden tip, start targeting individual keywords on separate pages and use multiple pages for related words. General landing pages for mixed or general topics generally will not work because you will not be able to compete for popular single keywords without adding phrases for longtail titles. The general advice is that you should keep the title short (less than 70 characters) and only target perhaps two or three primary keywords that are highly relevant to the content of the page and its objective. You can of course develop long-tail keywords that include your primary keywords plus a series of modifiers to make a ‘sensible’ title that makes sense to humans and the test the bots use to evaluate your sites.

void keyword stuffing

There is a lot of information on the dangers of keyword stuffing, which means over-use of your keyword or keywords in the title, description, and the body copy. Google invokes a penalty for keyword stuffing, though the threshold keyword density is not exactly known. There are various tools for counting keyword use frequencies. Keyword Density is simply measured as the relative number of times your search term (Keyword or Keyword phrase) occurs as a percentage of the total number of words on a given page. The ideal Keyword Density must not be greater than 5.5 percent. But various search engines have different thresholds before they apply penalties. Reasonably, high Keyword Densities can help boost page rankings but you don’t have to overdo it.

Keyword Density can be boosted by using your keywords repeatedly in the:

Title tagHeader tagComment tagBody tagAnchor tagImage tagAlt tagDomain name, andParagraph tag

Another general piece of advice for titles is not to exceed using the identical keyword in the title more than twice.

How Google and other search engines crawl and rank your keywords in the title

It is not widely understood, but Google and other search engines register and rank every individual keyword in your title and every combination – including various orders and positions for the keywords. Although there is a priority for phrases with the keywords in the order they are in the Title, and for words that appear first, Google will register all the keywords and phrases and derive a ranking for them.

Dilution of the weight of the keywords in the title

Google also appears to regard long titles as more likely to be Spammy (especially very long titles). Longer titles may also appear keyword-stuffed. Research has shown that the first keyword in the title has the highest weight; the second keyword has somewhat less weight and so on. By adding more words you may dilute the weight applied to each of them. For targeting two-word searches and phrases, it is important to keep keywords close to each other and in their ‘natural’ order. Try to match the likely order of the terms in the search phrase, to the order in the title.

Use multiple keyword phrases multiply your traffic

If Google derives a rank for all the words in the title, surely, by including two or three keywords rather than one will be more likely to get more traffic. The traffic for each word should add up and multiply. Understanding when this is appropriate and when it is not is the crux of optimizing titles. As explained previously the weight or value of the keyword appears to fall rapidly as you move from the first word to the last. More keywords appear to dilute the weight given for each word. Also, there is the important issue of relevance. Your page may be penalized if the words you use are not highly relevant to the content of the page.

The key aspect is competition – only use a single phrase if the competition is high

If there is a lot of competition for a keyword then it is best to only use a single keyword or phrase. Stick to the keyword phrase you have found using the Google Keyword Planner for use in the title. You know the statistic and competition for that exact phrase and it is unwise to fiddle with it. Various tools can be used to estimate competition for the phrase and the likely traffic. The Keyword Research tool shows how even minor changes in the phrase can dramatically affect traffic and competition.

If the competition is high you have to maintain the strength of your page and title to compete. Adding extra phrases will dilute the weight applied to the keyword. You will be competing against pages that are likely to be strongly targeted on that keyword phrase as well. You could lose the battle if you don’t have that singular, highly focused title for the keyword.

If there is moderate competition enrich your title with more keywords

For moderate competition, there are several ways you can go to use multiple keywords in the title.

1. Use two or more Modifiers

The solution to not duplicating the keyword is to add one or two extra modifiers or action words. If you look at the competitive keyword phrases shown by the Google Keyword Tool you will often find that two phrases look promising that both contain the primary keyword or phrase.

[action word 1 keyword] + [keyword action word 2] = [action word 1 keyword action word 2]

Let’s say, for instance, you are after a keyword title for your article about Green Tea health benefits and you want to use a longtail keyword narrowing the search to extracts. The obvious solution is:

Health Benefits of Green Tea Extracts

This provides a title for four phrases

Benefits of GreenHealth Benefits of Green TeaGreen Tea ExtractsHealth Benefits of Green Tea Extracts

Another example is a title about Professional Make-up Artists

Reviews of Professional Make-up Artists + Make-up Artist Portfolios = Reviews of Professional Make-up Artist Portfolios

This makes the title target four phrases in one:

Reviews of Professional Make-up ArtistsMake-up Artist PortfoliosProfessional make-up artist portfoliosReviews of Professional Make-up Artist Portfolios

In both cases, this very simple tactic makes it possible to create a short concise title that is enriched by optimizing it for more than one key term and narrowing down your target audience. Perhaps your article is about creating portfolios and how to find and review make-up artists and this title targets these keywords. Of course, it is often hard to find word combinations similar to these and it emphasizes that title design is a real art. These examples also show how the use of action keywords and modifier phrases to target buyers who are ready to buy, which will fulfill the aim of your website.

2. Long tail action based keyword choices

Long-tail titles using action words are generally more effective, as action-based queries usually attract users that have already got their credit card out and are hungry to find what they want and to buy it. Targeting your audience will lose part of the potential audience but the ones you have filtered for will be more likely to buy.

The role of SEO title optimization is to enrich the keywords in the title that potential buyers might use when conducting a search to target the group that is interested in your product or services.

The best strategy is to build the longtail keyword title, not by using poorly selected action words as modifiers, but by researching the action words and phrases as well for maximum benefit.

Combine competitive keyword phrases to enrich the title

The Google Keyword Planner Tool might show two promising keyword phrases essentially related to the same topic. Let say, for instance, that you are trying to market green tea extracts using their health benefits, particularly to help people having issues with losing weight. The Google Keyword Planner Tool shows three competitive phrases

green tea health benefitsgreen tea extractgreen tea health benefits for weight loss

These phrases can be combined in ways that retain the order of the words (with green tea as the first phrase) but allow all these phrases to work in your title.

For example

Green Tea Extract: Health Benefits for Weight Loss

This longtail keyword is optimized for all three competitive phrases.

The ideal separator for two phrases

What is the ideal separator when using multiple keyword phrases? It does not really matter. You can use a pipe (|), a colon (:) a dash (-), or a comma (,)

However, don’t use the underscore ( _ ) as search engines don’t recognize it as a separator. These characters have no ranking benefit, but they help make your title readable.

Dealing with plurals and synonyms

In some cases, you may want to expand the keywords in the title to include plurals, synonyms, and other expressions for your topic. For example “architect supply”, “architectural supplies” and “technical drawing equipment” essentially deal with the same topic. You will need to craft the title to include these variants if you can.

For example: “Architectural supplies: Technical Drawing Equipment for Architects”

One of the potential dangers with targeting a single term in your title is that it creates a tendency for over-optimization, even when it’s not intended. You may use that single keyword everywhere on your page. If you include variants this is less likely to happen.

Don’t overdo it!

You need to be careful because adding more keywords can mean that each of them will have less and less impact. The more you try to stuff extra keywords into the less natural it is going to sound. For example, if you use the following title it will appear in the search results as –

Cheap Coffee | Gourmet Coffee | Ground Gourmet Coffee

Google won’t like it as it will be interpreted as keyword stuffing. Your potential customers won’t like it because they will see it as unnatural and likely to provide useless promotional material

Much better would be:

Low Price Ground Gourmet Coffee and Fresh Roasted Bean Suppliers

Which version looks better in the search results? Which one is less likely to be seen as keyword stuffing and deception?

If you have a keyword ‘Recycling Information – How And Where To Recycle

What if you want to optimize an article for the keyword “Recycling Tips” as well?

You could build a title such as

Recycling Information – Recycling Tips – How and Why Recycling is Better

But this is clearly keyword stuffing and Google will probably penalize it.

A better option is

Recycling Information – Tips, Tricks and How to Recycle

You can see that your second keyword recycling tips is in the title, but with the keyword word information in between. This will be slightly less effective but Google will still list you page for the keyword Recycling Information – Tips. If you look at the search results where the matching keywords are shown in ‘bold’, you will notice that this often occurs even for pages that appear high up in the search results.

Final thoughts

Building traffic is important, but it is conversion rates that really matterThe keyword “tail” should not “wag” your dog (marketing strategy). Keep the focus on the major keyword and keep it at the front of your title.Use association and keyword matching to group keywords. Rank your potential phrases for search popularity, but make sure you can compete for them and cascade down by adding modifiers to build a longtail title that will work.Never forget that a human user will determine your conversion rates, not the search enginesYour titles must be readable and appealing

If you do all this along with writing high-quality content intended for people and optimized for Google, your articles, blog, or webpages will suddenly be ranking for multiple keywords with high conversion rates. You may even end up being in the first spot for a keyword that was never your main focus.

Jacob M. is a copywriter, marketing blogger, inbound marketing consultant, and founder of Write Minds. He can be found on Twitter @jmcmillen89.

Subscribe to the Search Engine Watch newsletter for insights on SEO, the search landscape, search marketing, digital marketing, leadership, podcasts, and more.

Join the conversation with us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

The post How to optimize keywords and SEO titles with popular keywords appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Did you miss our previous article…
https://www.bbdfinancial.com/?p=145

Four tips for SEM teams to adjust to a privacy-focused future

30-second summary:

Within the digital marketing space, the conversation around privacy and cookie changes has focused heavily on programmatic and paid socialBut how will third-party cookie deprecation and new privacy regulations impact paid search?Here is what search marketers can expect and how to prepare

In the digital marketing world, targeting, measurement, and optimization have foundationally relied on the ability to accurately track user behaviors and performance across the web. However, as we all know, platforms like Google and Apple have introduced privacy-focused initiatives over the past few years that complicate targeting and measurement for advertisers.

When discussing the impacts of these changes, much of the conversation has focused on programmatic and paid social, which are undoubtedly the digital channels feeling the greatest impact. What has not been discussed in great detail is the impact on search marketing. How should advertisers adapt their paid search strategies to adjust to these new realities?

Before digging into action items, let’s recap the newest updates and how they’ll impact paid search campaigns.

Chrome’s privacy updates will have a greater impact than iOS.

There are two key privacy changes top-of-mind for search marketers in 2021. App Tracking Transparency (ATT), introduced through Apple’s iOS 14.5 update, requires a user to opt-in before a company can track their data across other apps or websites. Fortunately, the impact of this update on search programs for most advertisers is limited. Advertisers may see fluctuations in universal app campaign (UAC) volume, and search properties with a larger app-based audience (for example, YouTube) will experience some degradation in measurement and targeting. By and large, though, the ATT update is more of an issue for programmatic advertisers than search marketers.

Google Chrome’s third-party cookie deprecation, coming in 2023, will have a larger impact on paid search. From a targeting perspective, remarketing lists for search ads (RLSA) will become less effective without data on users’ behaviors across non-Google properties. As of Q3 2020, RLSA accounted for 20 percent of Google search ad clicks for Merkle advertisers – so this is a significant segment of traffic. There will also be new measurement challenges, especially for companies relying on proprietary reporting tech.

While iOS 14.5 is already a reality for advertisers, there is more than a year left to prepare for Google’s third-party cookie deprecation. There are several steps search marketers can take now to optimize performance within a more privacy-focused environment.

1. Lean into first-party data audience solutions to target

Effective audience segmentation and targeting will continue to be critical in search moving forward. Google offers several in-platform audience options, such as in-market and affinity audiences, that don’t rely on third-party data and can be leveraged by advertisers indefinitely.

However, there’s a greater opportunity for organizations to differentiate themselves by crafting a strong audience strategy using their own first-party data with Customer Match. Many advertisers already use Customer Match to some degree, but the data may not be refreshed regularly, or it may not be segmented in detail. The transition away from third-party cookies is the perfect impetus for fine-tuning a first-party data strategy.

First, advertisers should assess the quality of their first-party data. How comprehensive is the data that’s collected? Are there a lot of duplicate records, or is there a reliable unique record for each customer? All of the slicing and dicing in the world won’t be helpful if the data you’re working with is fundamentally flawed.

Next, marketers should assess opportunities to segment their customer lists in meaningful ways – a single “email subscribers list” isn’t going to cut it anymore. Smart segmentation is always important, but it will become even more critical because it will empower Google to build more tailored similar audiences.

After establishing segments, there must be a plan to refresh those audiences frequently. Determine an appropriate cadence for updating customer match lists and determine who’s responsible for doing it. Currently, this can be done through the Google Ads API or within the Google Ads interface.

Once a foundation is in place for your audience strategy, revisit your approach quarterly to ensure that segments continue to align with attributes important to your customers and your business. This also creates a natural check-in point to confirm that lists are being updated as expected and that they’re all receiving traffic. If needed, audience bid modifiers should be adjusted to reflect current performance.

On the topic of bidding…

2. Test or transition to Smart Bidding to take advantage of Google’s proprietary signals

While we, as advertisers, will have lesser user data available to us without third-party cookies, Google will continue to have a wealth of information about its users and their behavior on Google-owned properties. Google Ads’ Smart Bidding allows advertisers to take advantage of those audience signals to reach the right person at the right bid with machine learning. That’s not to say that segmentation isn’t important with Smart Bidding – it still is. One of the many signals the bidder looks at is all of the audiences a given user belongs to, including customer match audiences.

Advertisers can and should take advantage of custom audience segmentations through Google Analytics, Looker, or Google Cloud Platform (Big Query). And they should automate the pushing of defined customer audiences to Google marketing activation to maximize business data with Google’s Smart Bidding.

Whatever your advertising goals may be, there is likely a Google Ads Smart Bidding strategy to suit your business needs. For search marketers not yet using Smart Bidding, it’d be smart to start testing in early 2022 to iron out any kinks and have a full-blown Smart Bidding approach before 2023.

3. Get comfortable with new reporting methods

We’ve talked a lot about adapting to the changes to come with targeting, but privacy updates also create challenges for reporting. There will be a measurement gap that advertisers need to solve. Fortunately, Google Ads has solutions in place to help fill holes with enhanced and modeled conversions.

Enhanced conversions improve reporting accuracy by using an advertiser’s hashed first-party data to tie a conversion event to an ad interaction. Enhanced conversions are powerful in that they make a one-to-one connection between an impression or click and a purchase. Modeled conversions, on the other hand, find their power in scalability; Google has been using them to report on cross-device conversions for several years. When used in combination, advertisers get the benefit of precision where a one-to-one connection exists, while smartly estimating conversions in areas where it does not.

As privacy regulations increasingly muddy the reporting waters, the stakes are higher to work with Google to fill the gaps. If you’re relying primarily on proprietary technology for reporting, consider using Google’s measurement system to get a more complete picture of performance. Understanding the full impact of search is critical for being able to optimize and allocate budgets effectively. Note that Google’s global site tag or tag manager is required to appropriately track conversions.

4. Monitor universal app campaigns for performance changes

Advertisers using UAC to drive app downloads via paid search should closely monitor performance for those campaigns. So far, Merkle has observed a slow downward trend in tracked installs as a result of Apple’s ATT update. To avoid the effects of ATT, some advertisers are increasing their investment in Android or shifting spend there entirely. UAC can continue to be an effective channel for marketers, but reduced visibility on iOS may require bid or budget shifts in order to hit performance goals.

Conclusion

Privacy updates are changing the way marketers approach targeting and measurement. Don’t panic – but do put a plan in place. With the right adjustments, search advertisers can effectively pivot along with the industry. More than ever, advertisers must value first-party audiences driven by search to further customer engagement, experiences, and marketing ROI. Using that first-party data, in conjunction with machine-learning-based bid strategies and modeled and enhanced reporting, will create a foundation to help future proof search campaigns for privacy updates in the years to come.

Matt Mierzejewski is SVP of Performance Marketing Lab and Search at Merkle Inc.

Subscribe to the Search Engine Watch newsletter for insights on SEO, the search landscape, search marketing, digital marketing, leadership, podcasts, and more.

Join the conversation with us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

The post Four tips for SEM teams to adjust to a privacy-focused future appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Zero click search: the new consumer comfort zone

30-second summary:

Zero click search presents advertisers with the opportunity to pro-long budgets during periods when the paid search landscape is hypercompetitiveBrands can cash in on zero click searches for the organic element of their overall search strategy to gain visibility and drive conversionsBarilla Group’s global digital & search marketing manager, Nitin Manhar Dhamelia advises on zero click search optimization and measurement

Historic context

Back in 1998 when Google was founded, it served 10,000 searches per day and by 2012 it was 3,500,000,000 searches per day.​ And in 2021, search volumes continue to explode with Google serving around 5,600,000,000 searches globally per day.​

Its success in becoming a transitive verb was borne when Google tasked itself with bringing order to the chaos of the world’s knowledge. It knew that to achieve this magnitude of top-of-mind awareness, the key would be to create a window to the web that was inclusive, accessible, and easy to understand for the general population; it knew that inclusivity would accelerate adoption. Even today, the search giant is always working on improving the consumers’ search experience and 2021 saw several key algorithm updates roll out – passage ranking, page experience, page titles, MUM, mobile-first indexing, and more.

Not too far ahead in the future, Google is going to make it even easier for consumers to access information about brands.​ But why?

Micro funnels

Because people visit Google in key decision-making moments along the buyer journey – essentially, each Search session can be deemed a micro funnel. In fact, after the pandemic, there is no undoing the great reset. Nearly, 15 percent of Google search queries Google attended were first of their kind. And 81 percent of consumers discovered new brands online during the pandemic.

“There isn’t a world where people revert back to their 2019 behaviours, and part of that is now a part of their comfort zones.” – Corie Barry, CEO, Best Buy

Google’s own recent retail report identified four key consumer insights:

Dynamic demand: People’s buying patterns will continue to change in response to unpredictable timesDigital inspiration: People will use the internet to be inspiredConvenience: People will prioritize convenience while shoppingSupportive spending: People will be more mindful of how and where they spend their dollars with “values” playing a major influencer

Even though less favored by advertisers, zero click searches are pockets of opportunity for brands to focus on as part of their branded search strategy.

With great power comes great responsibility

With its always-on innovation focus, Google is constantly expected to eclipse itself (for the better) and the way it aims to achieve that is by presenting information in ever more easy-to-digest consumer-friendly formats.​

Its solution? Bringing convenience and comfort to their searcher’s online journey with zero click search. This means redesigning the search experience to align with a lucid consumer journey, which in some cases implies that – the journey both starts and ends in Google, and without a single click in the search results:

Squid Game Google zero click search

In terms of how this translates into volumes of searches, take a look at the data from an industry study below:


Zero click search data

What does this mean for brands?

In my own research the split of traffic between the core search marketing channels for a keyword that has a “need” intent, calculates to:

Paid: 6.5 percentOrganic (above the fold): 31.5 percentOrganic (below the fold): two percentZero Click Searches: 60 percent

Extraordinarily, the last number isn’t too far off an original 2020 study that was made of a sample size that is far greater than most brand marketers might have immediate access to.

However, when smaller, localized in-house studies surface very similar results it drives the conversation forward into where we need to focus a proportion of our overall search budgets: creating data-driven content that contributes to adding value and top-of-mind awareness (TOMA) to consumers.

Tips for brands to optimize and measure zero click search

The people also ask (PAA) feature in Google (essentially website content derived FAQs in Search results) are around six times more likely to appear in a search results page versus featured snippets.  And therefore, PAA should not be underestimated as a branding tool. So the first tip is to create editorial content that resides on your website and optimize for PAA – using long-tail search data.

And the second tip is to optimize your content for featured snippets across brand and partner websites – your keyword traffic or search traffic insights could help prioritize this activity internally.

Another interesting insight that stood out was – regardless of the industry, most “big” brands will trigger a PAA.

PAA box visibility stats

Measuring zero-click performance

Gauging the impact of zero click search remains a frequently asked question itself and a continued enigma that has hampered brands from focusing on this highly important search facet. These are some valuable avenues for search marketers to track the zero click search features’ performance:

1. Understand relativity

Understand the relationship between impression volume and average ranking for a target keyword(s) in the Google search console to create insights into where branded content can trigger a zero click search result.

2. Track soft metrics

This is where the soft metric shines – so by focusing on zero click SERP features for brand vs competitor domains, it’s possible to create an index to track the outcomes and evolution of a soft metric such as ‘share of intent’. This will help you grow product or service awareness/consideration via the zero click search element of your Search Strategy.

Piecing all this information and tailoring it to your brand will positively add a new dimension to your search marketing strategy.

Nitin Manhar Dhamelia is the global digital & search marketing manager at Barilla Group. Nitin has a 15-year track record of global B2B/B2C team management, governance, commercial experience, across Americas, EMEA, APAC.

Subscribe to the Search Engine Watch newsletter for insights on SEO, the search landscape, search marketing, digital marketing, leadership, podcasts, and more.

Join the conversation with us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

The post Zero click search: the new consumer comfort zone appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

2021 Google updates round up: everything businesses need to win at search

30-second summary:

There have been three core updates in 2021, released in June, July, and November, while another was rumored but unconfirmed in OctoberFeatured snippets that fell under the YMYL algorithm were unexpectedly removed in February, then restored in MarchProduct reviews came under the microscope in April, with marketing and sales-centric language penalized in favor of expertise on review-centric websitesMultiple spam updates unfolded throughout the year, though these updates should not impact any website that follows Google’s guidelines

Successful SEO strategy is akin to dancing the tango with Google updates. Unfortunately for copywriters, the Big G can be an unpredictable partner at times. In addition to daily algorithm tweaks that go unnoticed, we all brace ourselves for core updates that have a sizeable impact on page ranking and performance. Throughout 2021, Google has confirmed a handful of updates.

Further updates have also been speculated by experienced web-based professionals, reporting these to aid others in remaining on the right side of an adjustment. Throughout this guide, we’ll discuss the updates rolled out by Google in 2021 to date.

Complete list of 2021 Google updates

As promised, let’s review all the algorithm updates issued by Google during 2021, major and minor alike. Some of these are official, confirmed by Alphabet themselves. The core updates are an obvious example of this. Others were noticed by webmasters of influential brands and discussed online. These unconfirmed updates are marked in red below.

1. Passage indexing (February)

The passage indexing update, announced in October 2020, is probably better described as passage ranking. The purpose behind the update is simple and noble. It will pick out one particular sentence or paragraph from a long-form article, aiding a niche web query and avoiding irrelevance.

Essentially, this update seeks out keywords and terminology in an entire article rather than focusing primarily on titles and subheadings. At the time of writing, Google projects that this will impact around 7 percent of search queries. At this point, the passage indexing update also only applies to copy written in US English, though this will eventually become global and translingual policy.

Now, you may be wondering how this differs from a featured snippet. The short answer is that a snippet is chosen based on the whole web page, seeking relevance to the subject at hand in all aspects of the query. The passage indexing update can pick up on a small element of a broader discussion that would otherwise be banished to the mid-page and beyond. Speaking of featured snippets, however…

2. Featured snippet drop/featured snippet recovery (February and March)

In mid-February, MozCast noticed that featured snippets vanished from countless SERPs on Google. This involved a decline of some 40 percent, the largest in over six years. Snippets that revolved around medical or financial advice were particularly impacted. Some of the keywords and terms that experienced this plummet included:

AcneAutismDiabetesFibromyalgiaInvestmentIRALupusMutual fundsPensionRisk management

As you’ll see, the YMYL broad algorithm appeared to be a particular bone of contention. We’ll never know for sure, as this update – if indeed there was an update – has never been confirmed or denied by Google. What’s more, around a month later, these snippets returned as though they had never been away.

Without any explanation behind the mystery, it’s impossible to offer advice to webmasters on how to avoid a future unwarned absence of featured snippets. The fact that YMYL was hit so hard suggests that it was a deliberate action, though. Whenever working within this niche, proceed with caution – especially if relying on SERPs for ecommerce opportunities.

3. Product review update (April)

April’s product review update was also critical to ecommerce sites and those that collate product insights. Google is adamant that this has not been a core update. However, the approach that content marketers must now take mirrors the core updates that arose later in the year.

Following the review update, it’s more important than ever that product reviews remain strictly factual. That means discussing a product’s qualities (or lack thereof) without clear and obvious attempts to push for a sale from an affiliate. Sites that used their copy to talk up the qualities of a product using popular keywords and directing consumers toward Amazon were typically penalized.

Thin copy, as always, captured Google’s attention too, and not in a positive manner. Meaningless, fluffy words designed to pad out a page, along with repetition, will see a page slide down the rankings. A product review site that hopes to remain in good stead with Google must remember the fundamental rules of E-A-T. You can still attempt to make a sale, but not at the expense of demonstrating expertise, authority, and trustworthiness.

4. Multitask Unified Model aka MUM (June)

June was a busy month for Google, starting with the Multitask Unified Model update, better known as MUM. This update could be considered a logical extension of the previously discussed passage indexing update. MUM also used AI to improve the search experience for users, replacing BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers).

It’s claimed that MUM is at least 1,000 times more powerful than its predecessor. In addition to providing greater, much more insightful data for users, MUM works to eradicate language barriers, including misspellings, leaning upon nuance to meet the expectations of a search.

Perhaps more importantly, MUM means that irrelevant content, picked up through a questionable use of keywords to game the SEO system, will soon disappear from the top of the page in favor of more appropriate content. The core update that came later in the month garnered most of the headlines, but don’t sleep on the impact of MUM.

5. Spam updates (June)

Next in June came a spam update, which took place over two weeks. In theory, this update should not have impacted any website operating under white hat SEO rules. It was designed purely to keep content relevant and appropriate, battling against sinister tactics.

As always, though, there was room for error with this update. It’s always advisable to keep on top of the latest webmaster guidelines laid out by Google. This way, a site is considerably less likely to fall foul to a misunderstanding and accusations of black hat traffic-hoarding.

Updates to Google’s Predator algorithm could also be considered a crucial part of this update. Google has been taking lengths to protect people from harassment online, and a big part of this is downgrading sites that seemingly exist purely to denigrate a reputation.

6. Page experience update (June)

Page experience update sounds like a grand event, comparable even to a core update. In reality, this was a pretty low-key affair. It was also a slow procession, kicking off in June and rumbling on until August. All the same, there will be a degree of ebb and flow as a result. Discuss the update with your UX designer and ensure it remains at the forefront of your thinking.

One of the biggest takeaways from this update is that AMP is no longer essential to rank as a top new story. That could make a sizeable difference to any reporting site. The usual caveats still apply, though – sticking to the established policies of Google News is non-negotiable. Although AMP is no longer critical, ensure your news articles remain mobile-friendly, hosted on a fast and secure server, and unfold devoid of interruptions such as intrusive advertising.

7. Core update (June and July)

Here’s the big kahuna that has every web admin across the globe on tenterhooks – Google’s major summer core update. In 2021, Google announced two updates over June and July, both of which would be connected.

As always, there were winners and losers from this update. In a recurring theme, YMYL sites appeared to lose a great deal of traffic throughout the update – especially in June, when the changes were most volatile. Thin content in any niche also seemed to be a particular focus of this update, with such sites pruned cautiously.

However, some sites that were previously heavily penalized may have experienced a little bounce back. It has been claimed that the biggest priorities of the June and July updates, other than thin copy, have been domain age and the use of backlinks.

Review the traffic of any old sites that you wrote off after the game-changing updates of 2019. These sites may have experienced a revival in page ranking and could be worth reinvestment. Just be mindful that Google may consider this an oversight and reverse the decision at any moment.

8. Link spam update (July)

Another spam-detecting algorithm rolled out in July, this time focusing on backlinks. What’s interesting here is that Google referred to this update as ‘nullifying’ spam links, not penalizing them.

Essentially, Google will just stop counting inappropriate links toward a page ranking and quality score. Naturally, though, it would feel like a punishment if a site relied upon these links previously – this is an important Google update for link-building professionals to pay attention to.

Keep an eye on the links on your site if you have seen a drop in traffic, ensuring that they meet Google’s link scheme standards. It could be all too easy to fall foul to this update based on outdated copy that has not been updated in some time and now links to an altered and irrelevant online location.

9. Page title rewrites (August)

Here’s an interesting update from August. Google started to adjust carefully selected page titles, leading to different ‘headlines’ in search results. This may have SEO consultants across the world wailing and gnashing their teeth, seeing meticulously curated messaging adjusted according to Google’s whims.

Rest assured, the page titles are not undertaking complete rewrites. We are talking about adjustments, not wholesale changes, to title tags. All the same, it could be enough to leave a webmaster frustrated with the outcome. Nobody wants to be accused of click-baiting, especially when the news industry has a questionable reputation with a cynical population segment.

There is little anybody can do to prevent this. To retain some measure of control, though, keep your H1 headings short and readable, and be mindful of your H2 headings. These may be used, in part or whole, to adjust the title of a search result.

10. Speculated core update (October)

We previously discussed how, back in February, MozCast acknowledged some strange patterns pertaining to featured snippets that Google never acknowledged. Something similar unfolded in October when various significant webmasters noted sizeable changes in traffic and performance. This led to claims that Google had engaged in another core update.

Much like February, these changes remain unconfirmed. However, as we’ll discuss in a moment, there was a reasonably seismic core update in November. Given that the previous update unfolded over two months, it is not beyond the realms of possibility that Google adopted the same practice this time around.

11. Spam update (November)

Another spam update occurred in November 2021, once again targeting infractions that break Google’s general content guidelines. A website that does not contravene basic regulations or cut SEO corners should remain unaffected. Do keep an eye on your traffic and performance, though. If you notice any fluctuations, it could be time for a refresh of your content.

12. Confirmed core update (November)

Finally, we had another core algorithm update in November. At the time of writing, this was still a very recent development. As a result, the impact of the update will become more apparent over time. Some early responses and acknowledgments have been noted, though.

The most significant adjustment appears to be mobile searches, which were declared 23 percent more volatile than the previous update. Again, much like earlier in the year, featured snippets and ‘quick answers’ in the YMYL niche seem the most heavily impacted. Health and real estate, in particular, have seen a big change in performance.

Now, it’s worth noting here that Google felt compelled to address the timing of this update. Danny Sullivan took to Twitter and accepted that an update just before Black Friday and the Christmas shopping season is not ideal for ecommerce sites – especially those that already adjusted their copy based on previous updates.

Source: Twitter

It will be interesting to see if this will change how Google approaches algorithm updates in 2022 and beyond.

This concludes our trip through the Google algorithm updates of 2021. Just remember, more tweaks and changes are made each day. Most of these adjustments have little to no impact on the performance of your website. If you have spotted a change in fortunes, though, review when this occurred. You may find the answer lies above.

Joe Dawson is Director of strategic growth agency Creative.onl, based in the UK. He can be found on Twitter @jdwn

Subscribe to the Search Engine Watch newsletter for insights on SEO, the search landscape, search marketing, digital marketing, leadership, podcasts, and more.

Join the conversation with us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

The post 2021 Google updates round up: everything businesses need to win at search appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Did you miss our previous article…
https://www.bbdfinancial.com/?p=121

You Sell Widgets, You Rank for Widgets, But You Also Want to Rank for Gizmos. Should Gizmos Get a Separate Site?

“Does Google expect my site to focus on just one thing?” is a common concern people have about their SEO campaigns, both local and non-local.  You might also have that concern if you’re thinking about wheeling out a service or product on your site that’s very different from your other services or products.

The one offering seems at least a little out-of-place with the other offerings on your site.  You wonder whether by adding it to your site you’ll mess up any existing rankings.  Maybe you also wonder whether the different/unusual service or product even can pull in some rankings on the main site, or if it needs to live on a separate site.

In considering an additional site, you’re not looking for extra work, but rather just don’t want to mess up a good thing or go on a fool’s errand.   Of course, there may also be a “branding” concern, but I’ll set that aside because it may not be an issue for you, or maybe you’ve already figured it out.  So I’ll assume your main worry is purely an SEO one – about whether you’ll water down your site and end up not ranking for much at all.

I’ll give you my short answer now, and fill in some gaps in a minute: you CAN successfully branch out on your site and rank for a service/product that’s different from the others, if you play your cards right that will not mess up your rankings for the other offerings, and unless branding is a big concern you do not need a separate site.

As usual, what I say is based on what I’ve seen for clients and observed in the wild.  In keeping with that, here are a few real-life examples I’ve been involved in, which may sound like the situation you’re in:

Example situation #1: A roofing company tries to rank also for siding terms and gutter terms, and succeeds.

Example situation #2: A divorce attorney tries to rank also for bankruptcy and personal-injury terms, and succeeds.

Example situation #3: A couples counselor tries to rank also for individual-therapy terms, and succeeds.

Example situation #4: A dentist who focuses mostly on cosmetic procedures tries to rank also for implant-dentistry terms, and succeeds.

Example situation #5: A battery shop tries to rank also for phone-repair terms, and succeeds.

I have more examples, but you get the idea.  In those cases and in many others I’ve seen, the branching-out didn’t involve whipping up a separate site for the different service.  You’ve probably also seen exactly what I’m talking about: No doubt you have seen some local businesses outrank you for terms that are dead-on relevant to your business and not very relevant to theirs, and thought “Why are they outranking me for that term – WTF?”

The kicker is that if those competitors went the route you’ve considered – if they had created separate sites for the relative oddball services or products – there’s a good chance they wouldn’t have outranked you.  Instead they chose to kept everything together, and it seems to have worked out perfectly.

 

But wait a minute.  Doesn’t Google care about the theme of your whole site?  Don’t you get some advantage from focusing on a niche?  Doesn’t Google favor specialists over generalists (especially in the Google Maps results)?

Yes, to some extent.  Where all else is equal, the specialized site has an advantage over the plump site, probably because generally more of the pages are relevant to the niche and viable to rank, because the domain name is probably dead-on relevant, because probably a greater percentage of the links are from sites relevant to the niche, and for about half a dozen other reasons I can think of (speculate on).  That’s why you can create a separate site, and why (with some work) it can be extremely effective.

But the older site and the newer site are not equal.  Probably the most important difference is the old site typically has more links from relevant sites than the new site will for a while.  Google knows more about the older site in general, and sees more signs of life, including whether you whip up a page for the new service and existing visitors go to it right away (even before it ranks for anything).  Your site may already have a smattering of rankings for terms related to the unusual service or product, even though you don’t have any pages for it yet.  The difference is that in one case you’re raising a kid for 5-6 years and then teaching him or her to ride a bike, and in the other case you’re only teaching a kid to ride a bike.  One of those processes is much quicker.

You have options.  You can whip up a new site to target the different or unrelated service, but it will take longer.  In my experience it’s easier to expand the range of terms the existing site ranks for.

How do you go about that?  By doing the basic steps I talk about all the time, most importantly:

On your longtime site that’s all about widgets, make a detailed page on the gizmo you offer.Go heavy on the internal links to the page about the gizmo, including on the homepage, main navigation, footer, and on a couple of other other products/services pages.Add to your homepage a section all about the gizmo(s). Keep all the existing content about the widgets you’re so renowned for.Get links from a couple of sites that are more relevant to gizmos than to widgets, to complement the links you’ve already got from widget-related sites.Get Google Maps reviews and other reviews from customers who bought the gizmo and who go into a little detail in their reviews.If possible, specify a “Gizmo Maker” or “Gizmo Seller” category on your Google Business Profile (Google My Business) page.Study the “performance” tab in Google Search Console and see if you’re getting any impressions for gizmo terms.On an ongoing basis add detail, internal links, FAQs, reviews, photos, videos, or other content to your “gizmo” page.In the later stage of that process revisit the idea of the separate site for gizmos. Yes, the one I said you should skip in favor of working on the existing site. If it ranks well, great.  It may.  Or if it doesn’t rank, you can always redirect or axe it.  It probably won’t do as well as the page (or pages) on the older site, or it will take more work than you’re willing to put in, but that’s what you’re here to find out.  Once you’ve avoided a situation where a dime is holding up a dollar, experiment away.

Do you have a site that seems too specialized for you to branch out on it?

To what extent do you have outlier pages that rank for very different terms from what your other pages rank for?  Why do those pages do well, as far as you can tell?

Any questions, puzzles to figure out, or strategy tips?

Leave a comment!